The Star Wars Promise

Simon Pegg said it best when he said “Being a geek means never having to play it cool about how much you like something.” In 1977, Star Wars came out in theaters and a fandom was born. Three decades later, that fandom was divided into three groups and now that Disney owns the franchise, whip out your calculators folks: the math is about to get serious. I remember when my dad sat me down and we powered through four, five, and six for the first time. I fell in love with cinema that day. He told me about how cool it was to be working in theaters when A New Hope came out and how epic it was when Lucas dropped the father-bomb on audiences for the first time.

No matter which trilogy or individual Star Wars movie brought you to the fan side, there is one commonality that keeps us all bound to the ever expanding universe, and that is at one point in our lives, there was nothing more exciting than the Wars. As a fan of both trilogies so far, I get heat for it, but it’s always appreciated. Don’t chastise anyone for liking any part of this beautiful universe; appreciate each fan for their own unique perspective. I love the fact that there are fans of the original series that don’t really care for the new trilogy. If you think about it, it just goes to show you that they love Star Wars as much as you and set even higher expectations based on that love. Liam-Neeson-in-Star-Wars-Episode-1-The-Phantom-Menace_gallery_primary

And now, Disney has promised us a Star Wars movie once a year for at least the next five years. A new generation of Star Wars movies both a part of the saga, and some stand alone features that explore even more of the force. I’m here to say that it’s okay to get excited. I mean, excitement is half the magic of going to the movies anyway. The feeling that you get when you think to yourself “this could be the greatest movie of all time” is the main reason that you buy that midnight ticket in the first place.

Here’s what we know: J.J. Abrams (Star Trek, Super 8) has been locked in for directing. The biggest concern so far is this: Will he be able to make a Star Wars movie that is overall different from Star Trek, yet brings that same epic feeling that he’s brought to the Trek franchise? Abrams has caught a lot of criticism for his use of the infamous lens-flare technique in Star Trek, but he’s handled it like a gentlemen. Star Wars fans just want to make sure that their new movies stand far enough away from the rival franchise’s hit(s) and that the saga is either continued in amazing tradition or that it isn’t squandered like the prequel trilogy. It’s also pretty settled that the three actors who star in the original trilogy will be reprising their roles as Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill), Princess Leia Organa (Carrie Fisher), and the ever popular anti-hero Han Solo (Harrison Ford). Han-Solo-Star-Wars-Episode-7

So there you have it fans, a half decade of the Wars…so far. We know Disney has the bank, but is the talent enough for us? What is your favorite Star Wars memory? What are your thoughts concerning the future of Star Wars? Let us know what you think!

Dustin Sanson

Dustin Sanson

Dustin Sanson

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  • BrianLeeMartin

    Thank you for not being afraid to admit you like the prequels! I think they get a FAR worse rap than they deserve. Something that really gave me some perspective on just how Star Wars has evolved for new generations of fans is working with students. A few years ago, the high schoolers I knew would ardently defend the prequels–they were THEIR Star Wars. And recently, I’ve met some elementary-aged kids who absolutely swear by The Clone Wars (one of them said that he hates Palpatine because “he turned the clones bad”). Older fans who still, almost ten years later, gripe about how the prequels “ruined their childhood” need to step back and look at just how those movies MADE the childhoods of a new generation of fans. You had your Star Wars, guys; let these kids have theirs.

    Still, I’m pretty nervous about the prospect of a new film every year. I remember full-well just how AMPED everyone was for Phantom Menace (I worked in a cinema for the release of all three prequels), and regardless of what everyone ultimately thought of that movie, that feeling was really something magical. I’m just worried that oversaturation will sort of devalue the product (i.e.- make each new movie just a little LESS special to us).

    • dustin_sanson

      Yeah definitely! I just think that today the guilty pleasures outnumber the regular pleasures and it’s because we are sometimes afraid of saying we like something for fear of our friends responding saying they disagree and following it up with an awkward silence and change of topic. Not just with Star Wars. I just want to see us open the walls again and get constructive conversation going other than “how can you not like this?” and like you mentioned, the “ruined childhood”.

      As for Star Wars, like anything else, I tend to remain optimistic until at least the first teaser. I think all fans across the board have the highest hopes for the new stuff. I think I’m most excited for the limitless possibilities with light sabers!

    • huntermc

      My daughter is six years old, and she loves Jar Jar. She has a talking Jar Jar doll that she plays house with and she thinks he’s the greatest character. When she’s older, I’m sure she will look back with fond nostalgia on the prequels, just as I do with the original trilogy.

      • dustin_sanson

        I’ve never hid my feelings towards the character of Jar-Jar, but this is one of the coolest stories I’ve ever heard. That’s what I love about the Wars!

  • BrianLeeMartin

    Thank you for not being afraid to admit you like the prequels! I think they get a FAR worse rap than they deserve. Something that really gave me some perspective on just how Star Wars has evolved for new generations of fans is working with students. A few years ago, the high schoolers I knew would ardently defend the prequels–they were THEIR Star Wars. And recently, I’ve met some elementary-aged kids who absolutely swear by The Clone Wars (one of them said that he hates Palpatine because “he turned the clones bad”). Older fans who still, almost ten years later, gripe about how the prequels “ruined their childhood” need to step back and look at just how those movies MADE the childhoods of a new generation of fans. You had your Star Wars, guys; let these kids have theirs.

    Still, I’m pretty nervous about the prospect of a new film every year. I remember full-well just how AMPED everyone was for Phantom Menace (I worked in a cinema for the release of all three prequels), and regardless of what everyone ultimately thought of that movie, that feeling was really something magical. I’m just worried that oversaturation will sort of devalue the product (i.e.- make each new movie just a little LESS special to us).

    • dustin_sanson

      Yeah definitely! I just think that today the guilty pleasures outnumber the regular pleasures and it’s because we are sometimes afraid of saying we like something for fear of our friends responding saying they disagree and following it up with an awkward silence and change of topic. Not just with Star Wars. I just want to see us open the walls again and get constructive conversation going other than “how can you not like this?” and like you mentioned, the “ruined childhood”.

      As for Star Wars, like anything else, I tend to remain optimistic until at least the first teaser. I think all fans across the board have the highest hopes for the new stuff. I think I’m most excited for the limitless possibilities with light sabers!

    • huntermc

      My daughter is six years old, and she loves Jar Jar. She has a talking Jar Jar doll that she plays house with and she thinks he’s the greatest character. When she’s older, I’m sure she will look back with fond nostalgia on the prequels, just as I do with the original trilogy.

      • dustin_sanson

        I’ve never hid my feelings towards the character of Jar-Jar, but this is one of the coolest stories I’ve ever heard. That’s what I love about the Wars!

  • http://twitter.com/MediaCritiquer MediaCritiquer.com

    JJ’s Star Trek is a travesty. “Alternate timeline” = lazy writing I think Into Darkness will show that he painted himself into a corner with his alternate timeline approach. The trailers look dreadful. And what’s with those rubber suits?!

  • http://twitter.com/MediaCritiquer MediaCritiquer.com

    JJ’s Star Trek is a travesty. “Alternate timeline” = lazy writing I think Into Darkness will show that he painted himself into a corner with his alternate timeline approach. The trailers look dreadful. And what’s with those rubber suits?!

  • http://www.facebook.com/steven.renkovish Steven Adam Renkovish

    This is an excellent article! :)

  • Steven Adam Renkovish

    This is an excellent article! :)