Agatha Christie’s Poirot Knew What Modern Crime Dramas Are Afraid To Say

Dame Agatha Christie, the “Queen of Crime,” wrote 66 novels, more than a dozen collections of short stories, and several plays, the quality of which have ensured her a permanent spot on the best-sellers list. Her beloved characters continue to grace screens, stages, and shelves all over the world and her audience’s devotion to her stable of detectives such as Miss Marple, Tommy and Tuppence, Mr. Satterthwaite, and Parker Pyne,

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It isn’t often I find myself identifying with the villain nowadays, but BBC’s 2012 two-part TV movie The Mystery of Edwin Drood had me examining my own past through the lens of this tale by Charles Dickens. This is the last story that Dickens ever wrote but he wasn’t able to complete it. At first I was uncertain about how Gwyneth Hughes would choose to end the tale, but she

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I think I’ve officially left the Doctor Who fandom. Not out of anger or bitterness at Moffat for his sexism or love of the reset button but out of grief. My little heart couldn’t take any more. Not after “Angels Take Manhattan.” When I watched that episode, I knew the Ponds were leaving. I expected Moffat to do something horrible. But something snapped inside me during that episode. It was

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Orphan Black is starting to get goooood. I’m always surprised that science fiction doesn’t get more attention for its fascinating explorations of faith and science. While some of these forays are ultimately disappointing, others can be incredibly arresting in a way that other genres really cannot, being limited by reality. Battlestar Galactica, for example, was one of the most interesting studies of faith that I’ve ever seen, dealing with an actual divine

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